International Law: LOAC: Proportionality

Latest in International Law: LOAC: Proportionality

Israel-Palestine

What to Make of the UN's Special Commission Report on Gaza?

Israel is the canary in the IHL coal mine. Approaches that begin as a way of constraining Israeli military action quickly migrate to constraining U.S. military action. The effort by the Special Commission to find war crimes in civilian deaths in urban targeting situations in which non-uniformed fighters exploit civilians for combat cover is thus worth some attention.

Israel-Palestine

Human Rights Council Commission of Inquiry Report on Gaza Released

Here it is. Here's the press release that accompanies it:

GENEVA (22 June 2015): The United Nations Independent Commission of Inquiry on the 2014 Gaza conflict has gathered substantial information pointing to the possible commission of war crimes by both Israel and Palestinian armed groups.

International Law: LOAC: Proportionality

Defining Anticipated Military Advantage: the Importance of Certainty

When scholars analyze Israeli military actions against Palestinian militant groups, the discussion inevitably turns to the principle of proportionality. Advocates and analysts sift through lists of the names of the dead, review drone footage from before missile strikes, and endlessly debate whether anticipated military advantage justified foreseeable civilian costs. Less discussed, however, is a more basic question: what sort of expected gains actually qualify as “anticipated military advantage?”

International Law: LOAC

Drone Strike Errors and the Hostage Tragedy: Mapping the Issues in the Newly-Catalyzed Debate?

The use of lethal force (whether via armed drone, manned aircraft, cruise missile, helicopter assault, etc.) has been a cornerstone of U.S. counterterrorism policy for many years, both in places where we have ground combat deployments and places where we do not. Throughout this period, the legality, efficacy, wisdom, and morality of this practice has been the subject of intense scrutiny and debate. Nonetheless, the kinetic option has proven remarkably durable over time (especially as compared to its sibling, the use of non-criminal detention).

International Law: LOAC

Folk International Law and the Application of LOAC in Counterterrorism Operations

Naz Modirzadeh’s fascinating series of Lawfare posts (here, here, and here) discussing her article, Folk International Law, provides an excellent primer on the potential consequences and confusion that result from amalgamating distinct legal doctrines, regardless of whether such creative tinkering is couched under the rubric of “

International Law

Transatlantic Dialogue on Int'l Law and Armed Conflict: Ken Watkin on the IHL/IHRL Interface

The next installment in the series of posts derived from this summer's Transatlantic Dialogue on International Law and Armed Conflict is now live at the ICRC's Intercross blog. It is from Ken Watkin, and it concerns the overlap of IHL and IHRL. A taste:

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