FISA: 702 Collection

In 2008, Congress passed a set of updates to the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA), including Section 702 which authorized warrantless surveillance of non-U.S. persons reasonably believed to be outside the country. However, documents leaked by Edward Snowden revealed that 702 was being used far more heavily than many expected, serving as the legal basis for the collection of large quantities of telephone and Internet traffic  passing through the United States (and unlike 215, including content rather than just metadata). Still, as 702 only permits overseas collection, most criticism of the provision has come from abroad. But many domestic privacy advocates also worry that large amounts of American communication are being swept up “incidentally” and then used as well.

Latest in FISA: 702 Collection

FISA: 702 Collection

What Should Senator Wyden Ask About Section 702 Now?

In light of Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats’s argument that quantifying the collection of U.S. person communications under Section 702 would exhaust agency resources and threaten privacy rights, here are four questions that Senator Wyden should ask now to establish why an estimate has not been provided and what could be done to encourage such an estimate in the future.

FISA: Reform

Senator Tom Cotton Introduces Bill to Make FISA Section 702 Permanent

Earlier today, Senator Tom Cotton (R-AR) introduced legislation to make permanent Section 702 and the other components of Title VII of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, along with a group of Republican Senators. 

Senator Cotton's press release on the bill is available here and below. Lawfare will publish the draft legislation once it becomes available.

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