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The Cyberlaw Podcast: Attribution of Cyberattacks

Episode 182 features a panel of experts on attribution of cyberattacks. I moderated the panel at the Georgia Tech 15th Annual Cyber Security Summit in Atlanta on September 27, 2017.  Panel members included Cristin Goodwin of Microsoft, Rob Knake of the Council on Foreign Relations, Hannah Kuchler of the Financial Times, and Kim Zetter, author of a 2014 book on the Stuxnet attack.

Podcasts

The National Security Law Podcast: It Is More Likely Than Not That Our FARRA Discussion Will Bore You

If you have ever wondered what statutes, constitutional principles, and judicial precedents come into play when the U.S. government contemplates transferring an American citizen from our military custody to the custody of another government, this is the episode for you.

Podcasts

The Lawfare Podcast: Oona Hathaway and Scott Shapiro on 'The Internationalists'

The Kellogg-Briand Pact is often remembered as a failure. Signed in 1928 to outlaw war, it was followed in just over a decade by one of the deadliest conflicts in history. But Oona Hathaway and Scott Shapiro see the pact differently. In their new book, "The Internationalists: How a Radical Plan to Outlaw War Remade the World," they argue that though it did not successfully end all war, the pact changed the way states resolve disputes, reduced the likelihood of conquest, and set of a chain of events that led to the modern world order.

Podcasts

The National Security Law Podcast: How Did We Get Through This One Without Saying 'Posse Comitatus'?

Seriously, how did they manage not to say “posse comitatus” during this episode? Sigh. In this week’s episode, Professors Vladeck and Chesney do talk at length about various legal issues raised by the devastation in Puerto Rico, including the possibility of an invocation of the Insurrection Act. In addition, they renew attention to the as-yet-unnamed U.S. citizen who apparently remains in U.S.

Podcasts

The Cyberlaw Podcast: Robots and Cyber and Space, Oh My! The Pantsing of International Humanitarian Law

In a delightfully iconoclastic new book, Jeremy Rabkin and John Yoo take the air out of 75 years of inflated claims about the law of war. They do it, not for its own sake, though God knows that would be enough, but as a prelude to discussing how to use the new weapons–robots, space, and cyber–that technology makes possible.

Podcasts

The National Security Law Podcast: Enemy Combatants, Agents of Foreign Powers

In this week’s episode, Professors Chesney and Vladeck explore three big national security law developments from the past few days.

First up: The news that the FISC, on two separate occasions, issued orders authorizing surveillance of Paul Manafort’s communications.

Second: The news late last week that an as-yet-unnamed American citizen fighting for the Islamic State in Syria is now in US military custody and being held as an enemy combatant.

And third: An update on the travel-ban litigation as it moves into the Supreme Court.

Podcasts

The Cyberlaw Podcast: Interview with Jeanette Manfra

Our interview is with Jeanette Manfra, DHS’s Assistant Secretary for Cyber Security and Communications. We cover her agency’s binding directive to other civilian agencies to purge Kaspersky software from their systems and her advice to victims of the Equifax breach (and to doctors who think that Abbott Labs’ heart implants don’t need a security patch because no one has been killed by hackers yet). I also ask how she’s doing at expanding civilian agency security from intrusion prevention to monitoring inside networks

Podcasts

The Lawfare Podcast: Brookings Panel on Cybersecurity in U.S. Elections

The evidence of foreign interference in the 2016 U.S. elections emphasizes the significant national security threat to our democracy posed by weak cybersecurity in election-critical systems. Last week, Susan Hennessey joined a panel at the Brookings Institution to address the national strategy for protecting U.S. elections with retired four-star general John Allen, Alex Halderman of the University of Michigan, and Dean Logan, the president for the California Association of Clerks and Election Officials. Michael O’Hanlon, senior fellow in Foreign Policy, moderated the conversation.

Podcasts

The National Security Law Podcast: NSA General Counsel Glenn Gerstell on Section 702

We have a special treat in this off-cycle episode! NSA GC Glenn Gerstell is in Austin to speak to our students here at UT, and (no doubt against his better judgment) he agreed to sit for an interview with Professors Chesney and Vladeck. The conversation focuses in particular on the nature, operation, and criticisms of Section 702 collection authority. As you probably know, Section 702 is scheduled to expire at the end of December, and there is certain to be a fascinating, high-stakes Congressional fight over its renewal in the months ahead.

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