Recently on Lawfare

Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act

Document: Supreme Court Decision in Rubin v. Islamic Republic of Iran

On Wednesday, the Supreme Court ruled 8-0 in Rubin v. Islamic Republic of Iran that Section 1610(g) of the Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act (FSIA) does not provide a freestanding basis for allowing parties that hold terrorism-related judgments under Section 1605(a) of the FSIA to attach and execute the property of foreign states that would otherwise be subject to sovereign immunity protections.

Podcasts

The Lawfare Podcast: Phil Carter on Civil-Military Relations in the Trump Administration

The military has been not been a refuge from the Trump administration's norm-defying nature. This week, Jack Goldsmith speaks to Phil Carter, a senior fellow at the Center for a New American Security, about the history of civil-military relations, episodes that highlight the Trump administration's departure from that tradition, and what that may mean for the future.

Podcasts

The Cyberlaw Podcast: News Roundup

In our 204th episode of The Cyberlaw Podcast, the team bumbles forward without Stewart Baker, who is spending the week racing his offspring down mountain slopes somewhere in Utah. Brian Egan and Jamil Jaffer begin by covering a few implications of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s indictment from Friday—the legal theories of the case a

The Russia Connection

Documents: Alex Van Der Zwaan Information, Statement of Offense, and Plea Agreement

On Tuesday morning, the special counsel filed the following criminal information document in D.C. federal district court. The document describes false statements made by Alex van der Zwaan. After a plea hearing on Tuesday afternoon, the special counsel's office released a statement of offense and plea agreement for van der Zwaan.

Cybersecurity and Deterrence

Indicting Hackers Made China Behave, But Russia Will Be Harder

The closest analogy for Mueller’s decision to charge the Russian trolls is probably the May 2014 indictment in United States v. Wang Dong, in which officers of a special unit of the Chinese People's Liberation Army were accused of hacking U.S. companies to steal intellectual property. 

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