Robert Chesney

Bobby Chesney is the Charles I. Francis Professor in Law and Associate Dean for Academic Affairs at the University of Texas School of Law. He also serves as the Director of UT-Austin's interdisciplinary research center the Robert S. Strauss Center for International Security and Law. His scholarship encompasses a wide range of issues relating to national security and the law, including detention, targeting, prosecution, covert action, and the state secrets privilege; most of it is posted here. Along with Ben Wittes and Jack Goldsmith, he is one of the co-founders of the blog.

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2001 AUMF

Repealing the 2001 AUMF? A Surprise Vote by the House Appropriations Committee

A pretty remarkable development in today's House Appropriations markup on the Defense Appopriations bill.  For many years, Rep. Barbara Lee (D-CA) has been putting forward amendments intended to repeal or sunset the 2001 AUMF.  They normally do not go anywhere.  This morning she moved one that would terminate the 2001 AUMF in 240 days, and lo-and-behold the majority went along with it.  It passed with only Kay Granger (R-TX) opposing.  

 

The National Security Law Podcast

The National Security Law Podcast: So Much National Security Law News…We’ve Reached Our Limitrophe

Had you seen the word “limitrophe” before Justice Breyer used it in his dissent in Herndandez v. Mesa? Neither had Professors Vladeck and Chesney, but that doesn’t stop them from exploring the Supreme Court’s action in that cross-border shooting case, with its implications for Bivens, qualified immunity, and the extraterritorial application of the Fourth Amendment.  Nor does Travel Ban fatigue stop them from unpacking all the details in Trump v.

War Powers

War Powers and the Su-22 Episode: Third-Party Defense of Coalition Partners

Early Sunday evening, a US Navy F/A-18 Super Hornet shot down a Syrian Air Force Su-22 that had just completed a bombing run targeting US-backed Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) in the Raqqa region.  The episode raises important questions under the U.N. Charter (see Adil Ahmad Haque’s analysis here).  But what about U.S. domestic law?